RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Feliway

The Madness of Moving


At our house, we are in the midst of moving. The process begins with thinning of possessions, much like on those “Clutter Buster” shows on cable. For weeks, we have been sorting into piles of “keep, sell, or donate.”

One of our cats tried his own move today. Twice he jumped into the open window of the truck parked in our driveway that was waiting to haul away our donations. We didn’t intend to donate him!

The pets definitely know we are moving. There are empty boxes in which to play and wads of newspaper to bat. The dogs try to escape from the open gate whenever we briefly prop it open to haul out boxes. It is a great game for them. I wonder whether they feel how the game helps increase my anxiety.

Moving creates madness. Each new day seems to bring more frenzied activity and chaos. Routines are disrupted. It is the perfect moment for a pet to escape.

So how can we make the moving process safer for our pets? Here are a few tips:

1. Make sure the pets have proper identification including a collar, a tag, and a microchip that is properly registered.
2. Take current photos of the pets and keep them with you.
3. Have your veterinarian prepare a Health Certificate that documents your pet’s current vaccinations and any health issues.
4. Get an extra supply of any prescription medications your pet may need as well as a copy of their medical records to take with you.
5. Ask your veterinarian to prescribe a mild sedative to give your pet before long trips, or try an alternative to sedation such as a pheromone collar (DAP or Feliway) or a few drops of a Bach Flower Rescue Remedy.
6. Long before beginning to move, make sure your pet is comfortable being confined to a carrier or a crate and knows how to wear a harness or a leash.
7. If traveling by airline, be sure to call the carrier several times on different days before your flight leaves. Confirm the rules for flying with your pet. Carriers have been known to frequently change their rules for shipping pets and you don’t want to get caught by surprise change at the airport.
8. Make a reservation at a good pet day care facility or boarding facility. Your pet may be safer there on the day the moving truck arrives.
9. When you arrive at the new location, do NOT let your pets near the outside doors for several days. They may try to bolt out the door. Now is the time to confine them to one room of the new house or to a crate. Use a DAP or Feliway diffuser in the room where you confine the pets, to help calm them in their new location.

And when the madness seems particularly chaotic, stop and take your pet for a walk. It will do you both good. It will help you both say goodbye to old familiar surroundings and become familiar with your new surroundings.

Bon Voyage!

Cat Talk

Posted on
Cat Talk

Does your cat talk?  If so, what does he say when he is hungry? “Meow?”  What does she say when scared?  “Hiss?” When she is happy does her motor go, “Purr?”   Compared to a parrot who might actually be able to speak hundreds of words, or a dog who might know a hundred words,  the verbal vocabulary of a cat is limited.  That isn’t to say that cat’s aren’t intelligent or that they cannot communicate.

Cat’s have a rich non-verbal  vocabulary.  The classic “Halloween” cat image communicates much about its attitude..  When a cat arches its back, fluffs its tail, flattens its ears, and opens it mouth, you had best beware!  It is likely safer to pet a cat that displays a softer posture, with half-opened eyes and erect ears.

Cats also communicate with chemical signals.  Special glands on their heads and on their paws emit an odor (a pheromone) that we mere humans cannot appreciate.  When a cat smells this scent, it has a calming effect on the cat.  The makers of a product called Feliway synthesized this pheromone and sell it in spray bottles and room diffusers.  It really works.  If you spray it inside a cat carrier before traveling, many cats will relax.  Room diffusers of Feliway will usually calm cats who are anxious about strangers or new surroundings.  I often install Feliway diffusers in the cat rooms at animal shelters and spray the towels I use in exam rooms.

Felines also communicate by marking with urine.  Yes urine.  Both female and male cats will “spray.”  The more cats in the household, the more likely one of the cats will start marking on walls, rugs, couches, and beds with spritzers of urine.  There is nothing more appalling to an owner than to come home and discover that the cat urinated on the pet owner’s bed or in their shoes.

What is the cat trying to say by gifting us with urine?  Many owners wrongly assume their cat is spiteful for some perceived wrong.  But cats have other non-verbal ways of showing anger or fear.  Cats that spray are simply saying, “Mine, mine, mine, mine, mine.”  The cats are claiming their territory, in a quiet, wet, and smelly fashion.  The tough part for cat owners to accept is that for a cat, communicating by spraying urine is normal behavior.  It is just as normal as meowing, hissing, or purring.  If you punish your cat for spraying, the cat will spray more because you obviously didn’t understand the message.  They will just try again and again, until they think the message has been sent.

So what can you do if you think one of your cats is spraying or marking in the house?  Begin by taking your cat to your veterinarian for an exam.  Let your vet first determine whether the cat has any underlying medical problems that might cause frequent urination that could be  mistaken for marking behavior.  Cats with kidney disease, diabetes, thyroid disease, or a urinary tract infection will sometimes urinate outside the litter box.  Cats that have developed an aversion to their litter box will also start voiding in inappropriate places.  (See my earlier blog on Cat Box Blues.)  If there are no medical issues involved, your veterinarian can prescribe an anti-anxiety medication such as fluoxetine (generic for Prozac)  to help your cat decrease its urge to communicate in this way.

For more information, visit these web sites:

http://www.feliway.com/us

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/healthinfo/brocuhre_housesoiling.cfm

Dr. Spencer practices at Bayonet Point Animal Clinic in Port Richey, Florida.

www.BPAnimalClinic.com Please LIKE us on Facebook!

727-863-2435